Self-Growth

The Visioning Stage of Transitions and Why You Don't Want to Skip It

In this theory of the stages in transitions, we reach the Visioning stage after moving through the previous stage, Death, The Unknown and Rebirth. We grieved our loss(es), are aware of what we are letting go of and cleared space for what’s next. We begin to feel re-energized and ready to dream our future. Visioning is a process that picks us up out of today and puts us someplace in our future, in our imaginary ideation of fulfillment. We use the right side of our brain when we vision, the part of our mind that is abstract, creative, intuitive, imaginative and sees the whole picture, rather than the left-sided linear, concrete, analytical brain.

Visioning brings into our awareness what lies deep in our core: our core values, our core truth, our creative energy, what gives us joy and peace of mind. We become aware of our intuition, paying attention to what our mind, body and spirit are telling us, listening for their whispers, shouts and aches.

Visioning is a helpful tool, especially when we find dreaming a challenge. Many of us want to get into action mode, to plan and do stuff, to feel that we’re moving things forward and accomplishing. Honouring this stage in our transition, especially when we let go of our past story and identity, and create space for the new to be imagined and intuited, is a powerful process maybe even transformative.

Emily Carr, “Scorned as Timber, Beloved of the Sky”
Emily Carr, “Scorned as Timber, Beloved of the Sky”

When Canadian artist Emily Carr painted “Scorned as Timber, Beloved of the Sky” in 1935, she was 63 years old. She wrote:

“There is nothing so strong as growing. Nothing can drown that force that splits rocks and pavement and spreads over fields...Life is in the soil. Touch it with air and light and it bursts forth like a struck match."

As children we visioned our dreams all the time. We pictured ourselves being and living our dreams. We are born with this ability to dream a spectacular future. The stage of Visioning is an opportunity to re-visit old dreams, resolve our disappointment and explore how we can fulfill their essence now.

I had one client who was going through both a career transition and a life stage transition, wondering “What’s next?” After clarifying her core personal values, I led her through a guided visioning (imagining) exercise. A clear picture came to her: of where she wanted to live, of her community and who was surrounding her, of how she wanted to feel, of what she wanted her lifestyle to be. She took gradual steps to make that vision become a reality. She emailed me recently,

“It was quite an undertaking and a huge transition. I remember waking up early one morning thinking, 'What the heck have I done?' When I doubt that I made the right decision, I remind myself about the core values that are so important in getting me back on the right path.”

It does not always happen that way. Another client going through a career transition drew a complete blank when he visioned his future self. He felt disappointed that he saw nothing, and that turned out to be a great launch pad for him. He learned about his intuition and grew it, discovering what and who resonated for him and what resonance felt like. He gradually trusted himself to try all kinds of new experiences, making choices that aligned with his core values, his passions, needs and strengths. He knew his present Purpose and built a successful business. What surprised him is that he has also grown his social network, feeling like he has found his tribe. He said, “I know it will be okay. My self-confidence keeps growing and I trust myself. I trust the Universe.”

Here are several different ways to vision.

  1. Attend a guided visioning workshop led by a life coach. There are in-person and virtual events. Check out the International Coach Federation Credentialed Coach Finder. I do offer occasional visioning workshops and individual visioning sessions, usually based on a theme, e.g. the New Year, retirement, career, health/wellness.
  2. Create a dream (vision) board, a collection or collage of images, text, meaningful quotes, poems, personal values that connect to your dream, your yearnings. It is not intended to be an artistic or crafty experience although it might be, and it will likely stir your creative and intuitive juices even more. You might want to create a scrap-book of personal visions for different aspects of your life.
  3. Write your vision in story format can be anyone who enjoys words, writing or writing stories.
  4. Write vision lists. The infamous “Bucket List” is exactly that, a list of your dreams. You can give it another snazzy title of course. I’ve tried this and it became so huge that I created categories. Then there’s Jerry Seinfeld’s take on the bucket list, “I made a bucket list, turned the "b" to an "f" and was done with it.” There’s also that.
  5. Watch films including documentaries that inspire visioning. Documentary and biographical films are great visioning tools. 15 Reasons To Live is one example. And there’s always *the* film, The Bucket List.
  6. Read books that inspire you to dream. Biographies and non-fiction like Callings by Gregg Levoy, and Martha Beck’s North Star.
  7. Notice what energizes you, makes you come alive, gives you pleasure and gives you thrills.
  8. Understand where and how intuition signals to you in your body.
  9. Travel. It’s a way to get out of your past story and identity very powerfully and see your life and yourself from a different vantage point.
  10. Be your own fortune-teller or astrologer. Look into your crystal ball or imagine your annual horoscope. What do you see? Write it down!
  11. Notice metaphors and symbols that come into your awareness and intuition, i.e. token animals.

Allow yourself to dream, intuit, yearn, create, and be inspired. Give yourself permission to dream, again.

Stages in Transitions: Death, The Unknown and Rebirth

This stage is one of the more challenging ones in the transition process. It usually follows the stage of Old Fulfillment, and is all about dealing with change — which many of us resist, avoid or delay. Even writing about it is more challenging , it gets right into the heart of taboo topics. Here goes... Death and Re-Birth, and the space in-between, the Unknown are all part of this one stage.  We often have a foot in each one of these pieces so it can feel incredibly overwhelming. It seems so much easier to stay in the previous stage of Old Fulfillment for as long as we possibly can. We stay because of the financial security, because it pays the bills, because it is comfortable and familiar. We stay even when it is stressful and affecting our mental and physical health. We stay for so many reasons.

I_AM shattered
I_AM shattered

What we might not realize is the tremendous potential for personal transformation that lies hidden within the dark folds of this stage. It requires work and sometimes that kind of personal growth work that feels too daunting and scary to pursue but it will take us into new places of self-awareness, confidence, vulnerability and personal leadership.

In the sub-stage of Death, the work is to recognize what is ending or dying: a dream, a role, a belief, an expectation, a core personal value, and/or a part of ourselves. It is here when we mourn and are tasked to acknowledge what we are letting go, shedding or releasing. Sometimes simply recognizing all the things that are changing can help us understand why we feel as much or as shitty as we do.

When we are faced with death and grief in a transition, what can be really difficult is when our family, culture and society discourage us from being open about it. It is hard to explore our loss and grief when we do not have permission to be in it and process it and instead are supposed to mask what we are thinking and feeling.

Before we can move into Rebirth, we have to go through The Unknown. It’s the part where we don’t know, where we ask ourselves “What’s next?” and “Who am I?” so naturally there is a lot of anxiety and un-rootedness here. It brings up our discomfort with not having answers, feeling lost, and not knowing the outcome. Is it any wonder that many of us stay with what is familiar and do not make a change? Learning to accept the uncertainty while not spinning off into the emptiness and anxiety is an ability, a skill, a kind of knowledge that deepens with each transition we experience and each time we face The Unknown.

she hero
she hero

Rebirth involves being able to see and believe that it is possible to create a new life and a new identity. Birthing — a new aspect of ourselves, a new core value, a new role, or a new identity — takes energy and hard work. It really is labour, we are giving birth to our new self. This requires beginning again, dealing with feeling incompetent sometimes, knowing that we will be asked to take risks, and in so doing, grow our confidence and courage. What can be better than living our life being true to ourselves?

Some things that can help:

It can help to balance out the dark intensity and overwhelm with lightness, comfort and kind self-care. Have a few things or habits that are easy, do-able and familiar: have your morning ritual of drinking coffee, make time for favourite leisure activities, wear your favourite clothes. It can help to create and be creative when we are feeling lost and lossed: write, garden, cook, bake, play an instrument or your favourite music, dance, draw, make a film, take photographs, journal, make a collage, sculpt, make a mandala, etc.

It can help to clear new space for your new self: recycle, donate, give away, toss what you are ready to let go of. This happens in layers of readiness so do what you can, even if it means re-organizing a drawer or closet. It does not matter if you don’t use the empty space for a while, just having it creates space and energy for you to imagine and dream of new possibilities.

It can help to do things that are spiritually grounding and emotionally centering: spend time in nature, spend time with animals or pets (borrow one if necessary), connect with like-minded folks, read books that are spiritually meaningful.

It can help to be grateful for what we have during this stage when the focus can be on what we are losing. Louie Schwartzberg’s video “Gratitude" is a beautiful affirmation on appreciating Life.

It can help to surround yourself with positive, supportive friends and family members and to stay away from negative, energy-draining, judgmental people.

It can help to explore your experience of the Unknown. Go into it, see what is in there that scares you and learn about yourself in there.

And when you feel so stuck in grief that you can’t take steps towards self-care or to move forward, it can help to get support from a qualified professional. Qualified counsellors are available through many workplace Employee Assistance Programs or referrals for counselling can be made by your family physician.

The following is a list of books and resources that might be helpful as you transition through this stage of Death, The Unknown and Rebirth. Managing Transitions: Making the Most of Change by William Bridges, 2009 When Things Fall Apart by Pema Chodron, 2000 The Hero’s Journey by Joseph Campbell, 1990 Girl to Goddess: The Heroine's Journey through Myth and Legend, by Valerie Estelle Frankel, 2010

Transitions: Old Fulfillment, Old Growth

We all have had exciting dreams, the kind that we badly wanted. Whatever it was, very often we accomplish “It”, we reached “There”: getting an education, going on a date, getting hired for our first job, earning a living, moving out of our parents’ home, being partnered or married, having a child or creating our lifestyle. We felt fulfilled. One unsuspecting day, something happens.

An event comes along and shakes our life up. Our job becomes restructured and no longer exists, our partner says they have fallen in love with someone else, our doctor diagnoses us with a chronic illness, our financial debt hits bottom and we have to declare personal bankruptcy. Something has changed in our life that topples our sense of fulfillment. It can be a shock to realize that our dream has died and our mind tries to make sense of our new reality.

Or we start to notice something. Our life, or an aspect of our life, is no longer fulfilling. “It” doesn’t excite us like it once did. Maybe it is boring or doesn’t feel like it’s such a good fit anymore. It no longer offers a challenge or sense of connection. Something has changed inside of us that shifts our sense of fulfillment.

This is the stage of Old Fulfillment. We wish we could go back in time, to go back to how “It” was. Our Saboteur voice(s) natters in our ears, tells us to stay safe, sometimes too safe. Too much caution can prevent us from moving on and opening ourselves up. That Saboteur voice activates our anxieties and worries, suppressing our confidence and courage, so many people choose to stay, if that is possible, out of fear and anxiety of what might lie ahead.

Becoming aware of what we fear about this transition can be a helpful first step. Some common fears are the fear of scarcity or poverty, loneliness or being alone, losing prestige or status, rejection, failure or success.

There is often a sensation of friction within us in Old Fulfillment where our core values rub uncomfortably against each other. For example, familiarity and stability rubbing up against challenge, vitality and growth. Which one(s) will we choose to honour?

It is during this stage that we feel a sense of disappointment, realizing that this is the end of our dream, and this is important for new dreams to be born. It is a normal personal growth process and along with it comes life experience, self-compassion and understanding, and confidence.

There is a natural cycle to the transition process. We can go through several career transitions during our work history, have several relationship transitions within a marriage, or experience various health transitions during our life due to injuries, illness, traumatic events and normal aging. There is a cyclical nature to transitions that happens because we are human beings and we are a part of nature.

By Snežana Trifunović old growth forest copy
By Snežana Trifunović old growth forest copy

We need Old Fulfillment. It reminds us of what is possible, how we have fulfilled our dreams before, that we are creative, adaptable and courageous. Like old growth forests, Old Fulfillment gives us a strong foundation for new energy, new dreams and new learning. Old growth forests have multi-layered heights and experience different stages of growth as they regenerate through natural or man-made disturbances. This regeneration is what makes them invaluable and rich with life. Being rich with life is beautiful.

The next stage in this model of the transitions process is Death, The Unknown and Re-Birth...

An Introduction to Transitions: the potential for growth and transformation

The start of a new year is a great time to talk about transitions, for many of us it’s the middle of winter greys and we’re looking for something that will motivate us and give us a boost of inspiration. As a life and transitions coach, people have shared their worries and fears about transitions. It can feel really overwhelming, confusing and isolating to go through a transition, knowing you are not alone in what you are experiencing is truly calming and reassuring. Learning about the stages of transitions has helped me personally, in my career, health, and relationships, and during my dad’s transition to death. I’m grateful to having this knowledge and awareness, I wish I had known this when I was younger and many of my clients and students have said the same. So I want to share it because you might find this helpful now.

The transition process that I’m going to share on this blog has four phases. I developed this version from a few resources including the theories of William Bridges, an educational consultant who first wrote about transitions, and Martha Beck, a prominent life coach featured by Oprah who offered wonderful new ways of approaching transitions. I have added my own adaptations and woven them throughout, trying to make it simple and also introducing some critical, heretofore missed elements.

Transitions are a normal and necessary part of life and living. We go through all kinds of different transitions in our lives — school, work, friendship, life stage, relationship, health, financial, residential, family. The longer you live, the more transitions you’ll face.

Each transition is unique and has its own special aspects or qualities. Regardless of what kind of transition we go through, it will touch other facets of our life. For example, you might be going through a health transition which may have ripples of impact on your career/work, your finances, your lifestyle choices, your relationship, and your social network/friendships. These parts of our life and ourselves are inter-connected after all, and knowing this can be used to our advantage when we want to create a positive change in our lives.

Transitions can happen with a shocking event that forces you to make a change. It can be a positive or negative shock (i.e. receiving a proposal of marriage, finding out you are pregnant when you were not expecting it, receiving a diagnosis of an illness). It can be man-made or natural (house fire, earthquake, tornado, motor vehicle accident). And also, opportunities can evoke change and bring about a transition.

Or, a transition can begin slowly, developing from within you. It can begin when the life you set out to live is no longer fulfilling or when an external event acts as a catalyst and begins to shift your perspective. You may notice that you’re yearning for something else, something more, and your essential self is doing all it can to call you forth and forward towards a change - in your career, your relationship, your health, your environment, in yourself.

colour spiral
colour spiral

In this transition model, there are four phases: 1) Death and Rebirth, 2) Visioning, 3) Stepping, and 4) Fulfillment. These four phases are fluid and dynamic, linear yet they flow into each other so you can find yourself stepping into or straddling several phases at one time. Sometimes it can feel like you are dancing back and forth between them, so it can be quite chaotic!

The four phases can be emotional in different ways: unsettling, anxiety-provoking, overwhelming, sadness, anger, confusing, frustrating, surprising, exciting, inspiring. The worst of it for many is the experience of feeling stuck in one of the phases. Ugh.

Where the transition process begins is complicated. Sometimes it can start with a shock, the sudden loss of your relationship or job or your health, that takes you right into the phase of Death. Other times it begins with a gnawing feeling of dissatisfaction with your work, your lifestyle or your relationship, and eats away at you in the phase of Fulfillment. So there is no one place where transitions always begin.

We first learn about transitions as children watching our parent(s): when they get a promotion, fired or bored with their work, move to a new home and community, become ill or diagnosed with a health condition, experience marital separation or divorce, go through mid-life, menopause, and/or the death of their parent. How did they cope with the transition? How did they manage their stress, stuckness, and grief? What did they do and not do?

Then we watch our friends to see how our peers deal with transitions: leaving primary grade school to start secondary school, starting puberty and exploding sexuality, increasing rights and responsibilities when transitioning from childhood to adulthood.

Each time we face a transition, we have an opportunity: to observe ourselves, reflect, and learn. It adds to our understanding of ourselves, for this and future transitions. It is an important process that is resilience-building and awareness-raising, possibly even transformative.

This is the first in a series of blog posts on transitions. Stay tuned for more posts where I will elaborate on each of the phases, and much more!

Resources:Finding Your Own North Star: Claiming the life you were meant to live, by Martha Beck, 2001 Transitions: Making sense of life’s changes by William Bridges, 2004

Copyrighted 2016, Life Changes blog, Ruth Tamari